Month: August 2017

Review: The Taste Of War: World War Two And The Battle For Food – Lizzie Collingham

This was a fascinating read, far more so than I’d expected. I’d picked this book up hoping for some kind of history of rationing and the British wartime food drive – ‘Dig for Victory’ and all that. What I actually got was an incredibly well-researched, comprehensive and thoroughly interesting history of the role food played in the Second World War… Read more →

Vendula London…

I have lusted over Vendula London bags for a long long time now, but I’ve never quite been able to justify buying one to myself. They’re a bit above my price range for bags, as I’m normally a girl who runs cheap and cheerful, rather than expensive but quality. My parents have long joked about the fact that the difference… Read more →

Review: Pathfinder: John Charles Frémont and the Course of American Empire – Tom Chaffin

I picked up this book hoping for a biography of John Charles Frémont, a man whose exploits and explorations I’d come across numerous times in other biographies, other history books. An explorer, a presidential candidate, a Civil War general – a fascinating figure for a biographer! What I got was a book very much more about Frémont’s expeditions than it… Read more →

Review: Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World – Laura Spinney

The First World War looms large in our collective cultural memory, arguable even larger than the Second World War, though more people died in that conflict. This has been ascribed to a multitude of factors – the pointless, the waste, the static pace, the fact that the ‘War to End All Wars’ only served to give rise to another, the… Read more →

Review: Eleanor Roosevelt: The War Years and After, 1939-1962 – Blanche Wiesen Cook

This final volume of Blanche Wiesen Cook’s three-part biography of Eleanor Roosevelt disappointed me. Not so much for the writing or research or approach, all of which are just as good in this book as the previous two, but purely for reasons of content. For all intents and purposes, Cook finishes up with FDR’s death in 1945 – the remaining… Read more →